IOB Object Browser

This program has been written to support users of Impulse's Imagine 3D rendering programme, Martin Hash's Animation Master and MetaCreation's Poser. Particularly those who want to write programs to manipulate IOB objects or to convert IOB or 3DS objects to MH3D or WaveFront formats.

As a companion to the browser, all the C++ code is available. This includes a compiler independant IOB object reader and writer that can made the basis of other tools, as well as the rest of the browser code (which requires Borlands OWL library).

The browser and associated code are compatible with all current IOB data formats, upto IFW1.3.4 (ie: they include long point/edge/face chunks with > 32K members).

Browser image

Features

Disclaimer

Whilst considerable care has gone into writing this program and it has been extensively tested on the author's machine, as with all software, it might go wrong. Be careful not to overwrite the only copy of some object you've spent hours creating. Always take back-ups, and keep them somewhere safe. This software is supplied on an 'as is' basis, with the author not accepting any liability for its behaviour.

Requirements

The IOB browser is a 32-bit Windows program, so should work on Windows95, 98 and NT (but I haven't tested it on 98 yet)

Get the program here: st-iob3D.zip (675KB)

Get the code here: c-iob.zip (102KB)

Comments please to: Clive Pygott


View 3D

Introduction

This program originally grew out of an interest in 3D modelling sparked by John De Goes' book "3D Game programming with C++" (pub: Coriolis Group).

After I bought a copy of Imagine, I naturally added the .iob file format into the code, and the program developed into an aid to making Imagine data objects. At present it has two principle functions, though others may be added later.

Whats it do?

The first of these may need some explanation.

Unmapped head

As all users of Imagine will know, the brush attribute function allows you to map a bitmap onto an object, using one of four wrapping algorithms. If the object is a complex one with distinct features, such as a human face, then there is a need to ensure that the bitmap accurately aligns with the object (eg: so the eyes on the bitmap finish mapped onto the eyes of the object). Getting the bitmap right can be a hit-and-miss affair. The function of the 'reverse mapper' is to eliminate the element of trial and error, by allowing the user to construct a pattern bitmap from an object. Each point or edge on the object becomes a point or line on the pattern. This bitmap can be used as a guide to produce the actual surface bitmap (if you have a graphics package that allows multiple layers, put the pattern on the bottom layer and make the actual map on a different layer, using the pattern as a guide. Otherwise, edit the pattern bitmap, painting over the guides). If the surface bitmap is then mapped onto the object using the correct wrapping mode, the bitmap's features will correctly align with those of the object (see the illustrations. The head above, taken from the 'Wierd Science' CD '3D Objects', is the unmapped object. The map below was produced by View3D and the bottom illustration shows the map applied to the face. I've turned the Phong shading off, so the alignment of the points with the facets can be seen). Note: only flat and spherical mappings are supported (I cannot get the cylindrical geometry to work!!)


Map image

It may be wondered why anyone should want to write their own 3DS to IOB converter, when there are several available on the web. Well, all the ones I've tried have had one or more problems:-

My translator attempts to maintain as much colour information as possible (though cannot at the moment reproduce bitmap mappings) and can handle big objects. Its also a Windows(tm) program - personally I hate command lines!


Mapped head

Disclaimer

Whilst considerable care has gone into writing this program and it has been extensively tested on the author's machine, as with all software, it might go wrong. Be careful not to overwrite the only copy of some object you've spent hours creating. Always take back-ups, and keep them somewhere safe. This software is supplied on an 'as is' basis, with the author not accepting any liability for its behaviour.

Requirements

View3D is a 32-bit Windows program, so should work on Windows95, 98 and NT (but I haven't tested it on 98 yet!), and looks best with 24-bit colour

Get it here: view3d.zip (630 Kbytes)

Get the code here: view-cpp.zip (106 Kbytes)

Comments please to: Clive Pygott